Fuggles Hops

Fuggle Hops

Famous hop first found growing in Horsmonden

The Fuggle was propagated in Kent by Mr. Richard Fuggle of Brenchley in 1875, the plant having first been noticed in about 1861, growing in Horsmonden.

Fuggles became the most widely grown hop in England – in 1949, it made up 78% of the English hop acreage, until Verticillium Wilt made growth impossible in much of Kent and Sussex. Now Fuggles represents only about 9% of the English crop, being grown chiefly in the West Midlands.

Brewing character: Perhaps the most famous and revered of English hops. Fuggle has typical English flavour, frequently blended with Goldings to improve “drinkability” of the beer, and adding roundness and fullness to the palate. This robust hop contributes all the essential characteristics of flavour, aroma and balanced bitterness to ales, particularly as its relatively low alpha acid content requires a high hopping rate to achieve desired bitterness levels. Sometimes used as a distinctive dry hop.

More info…

The Fuggle is said to have originated from a seed which was thrown out with some crumbs from a hop picking dinner basket on the farm of Mr. George Stace Moore of Horsmonden Kent in 1861, the plant being introduced to commerce by Mr. Richard Fuggle of Brenchley about the year 1875 now Paddock Wood.

From Paddock Wood History

Fuggles

The Fuggle hop was propagated in Kent by Mr Richard Fuggle of Brenchley in 1875, the plant having first been noticed in about 1861, growing at Horsmonden. It became the most widely grown hop in England (in 1949, in made up 78% of the English hop acreage) until Verticillium wilt made growth almost impossible in Kent and Sussex. Now it represents only about 9% of the English crop, being grown chiefly in the West Midlands. The variety is also grown in the USA, mainly in Oregon, and in Slovenia, where is has adapted its character and is known as Styrian Golding.

Brewing Character
Perhaps the most famous and revered of English hops, Fuggle has a typical English flavour, frequently blended with Goldings to improve ‘drinkability’ of the beer, and adding roundness and fullness to the palate. This robust hop contributes all the essential characteristics of flavour, aroma and balanced bitterness to ales, particularly as its relatively low alpha acid content requires a high hopping rate to achieve desired bitterness levels. Sometimes used as a distinctive dry hop.

Brewing Uses

  • Pellets – Yes
  • Extracts – No
  • Dry Hopping – Yes
  • Essential oil/emulsion – Yes
  • Kettle hop – Yes

 

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